May 16, 2005

Federal-provincial fund helps Ont towns upgrade infrastructure

Several Ontario communities are receiving federal and provincial government support for environment-related infrastructure projects through the Canada-Ontario Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (COMRIF).

In the township of Severn, improvements will be made to the Coldwater sewage treatment plant, including upgrading the force lines from the pumping station to the treatment plant and installing a new generator. The federal and Ontario governments will each invest up to $1,066,666 in the project. The township of Severn will contribute the balance of the total eligible project cost of up to $3.2 million.

A project in Kenora will see a renewal of the city's water distribution and sewer systems. Sanitary sewer lines in the downtown core will be replaced, and improvements made to separate stormwater from the sanitary sewer system. Clay pipe sanitary sewers will be replaced or renewed as well. Ottawa and Ontario will each invest up to $666,667 in the project, with Kenora contributing the balance of the total eligible project cost of up to $2 million.

In Sturgeon Falls, the COMRIF funding will be used to upgrade the Sturgeon Falls sewer system. The federal and Ontario governments will each invest up to $4,612,259 in the project, while the municipality of West Nipissing will contribute the balance of the total eligible project cost of up to $13.8 million. The municipality will separate the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in Sturgeon Falls, including the construction of a forcemain from the pumping station at King Street.

A project in Nipigon will include designing and constructing a rotating biological contractor secondary treatment system and a sludge storage lagoon with a six-month storage capacity. The federal and Ontario governments will each invest up to $1.9 million in the project, with the township of Nipigon contributing the balance of the total eligible project cost of up to $4 million.

The Geraldton sewage system will be upgraded, with improvements made to the town's collection, pumping and treatment systems to reduce extraneous infiltration from an aging sewer infrastructure and eliminate bypassing of untreated sewage. Ottawa and Ontario will each provide up to $3,129,100 for this project, while the municipality of Greenstone will contribute the balance of the total eligible project cost of up to $9,387,300.

The federal contribution to these projects is contingent on the successful completion of an environmental assessment of each proposed project under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act.

COMRIF is a five-year, $900-million program dedicated to improving local infrastructure to provide clean, safe drinking water, better sewage systems and improved waste management processes, in addition to addressing other public health and safety issues. Green infrastructure is COMRIF's top priority, with 55% of funding directed to projects designed to improve water quality, deal with climate change and foster sustainable communities and innovation.

All Ontario municipalities with populations of less than 250,000 are eligible to apply for contributions from this program. COMRIF Intake Two will be launched in the coming weeks through a public announcement and direct contact with eligible municipalities. More information is available on-line at www.comrif.ca .

Table of Contents  | Top of Page


  Ecolog Network